web analytics
ABOUT US
Frequent Topics
Comparing the Pfizer and Moderna Vaccines

Comparing the Pfizer and Moderna Vaccines

We found this interesting, an article comparing the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines by Mike Terry writing for BioSpace, the life sciences digital hub.  All of us are of course keen to know what may be coming with these Covid-19 vaccines.  The economic recovery and economic development we all hope for, depends upon the actual and perceived protections and treatments that are coming.

 

The best early news is the so-called “efficacy rate” … both vaccines are reporting 90%+ efficacy rates.   the CDC states that “vaccine efficacy/effectiveness (“VE”) is measured by calculating the risk of disease among vaccinated and unvaccinated persons and determining the percentage reduction in risk of disease among vaccinated persons relative to unvaccinated persons.

 

One big similarity in comparing the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines is that each use new messenger RNA technology.  RNA therapies that use mRNAs have been in the works prior to the Covid-19 outbreak, for possible use in personalized cancer vaccines and as vaccines for infectious diseases such as Zika virus.  However, as Mike Terry notes in his article, to-date, no therapeutic or vaccine using mRNA has been approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

 

to-date, no therapeutic or vaccine using mRNA has been approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

 

Both of these vaccine candidates require two doses about 28 days apart.  The Pfizer-BioNTech requires specialized refrigeration although the drug researcher and manufacturer Pfizer has designed its own packaging using dry ice that can be stored for weeks without the specialized freezers.

 

Pfizer and BioNTech have no development funding from the U.S. government, but do have a $1.95 billion agreement with the government to supply 100 million doses of the vaccine, with an option for another 500 million.   The Moderna vaccine trials were developed with financial and logistical support from the U.S. National institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and Operation Warp Speed, and could receive up to $2.45 billion in federal government funding.  And Moderna has a $1.5 billion deal to supply 100 million doses to the U.S. government.

 

The rapid progress from virus detection, sequencing information availability, and these vaccines being in their current state of testing, is a testament to the role of the burgeoning life sciences research and development industry in today’s connected global community.

 

The full article at BioSpace comparing the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines can be reviewed here:

 

Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna’s Vaccines Are Leading the COVID-19 Race. How Do They Compare?

 

real estate expert witness - Global Real Estate Consultants

Sovereign Wealth Funds Get Their Test in 2020, Aiding in Covid-19 Pandemic Relief

To be sure, sovereign wealth funds (“SWF’s”) have gotten their test so far, in 2020.  As the COVID-19 pandemic has decimated the global economy, country economic downturns have created possible calls for draws on SWF reserves.  As well, the economic troubles have also hit the investment returns of many of these SWF’s, reducing the projected (hoped for) enhancement of portfolio asset values.   Such a time.

 

Norway’s GPFG has reported a negative return (loss) of -3.4% for the first half of 2020, a loss of $21.3 billion.   Bahrain’s will draw $450 million from its FGRF sovereign fund to provide funds for the state’s general budget.   New Zealand’s Superannuation Fund managed to achieve a 1.73% return for the year ending June 30, 2020, although since the fund’s inception it has returned an impressive 9.63% per annum.  Iran is using its SWF funds to stabilize Tehran stock exchange.

 

Generally speaking, these SWF’s were formed over the years to capture current wealth for use by future generations.   A great many of the funds were literal monetization transfer methods, where a portion of national oil and gas revenue (wealth) has been transferred into a country SWF.  Investment from any particular SWF have first been intended to build these reserves for the benefit of those to come.

 

For 2020, the existence of these SWF’s has been a helpful resource to provide funds at an unusually critical time, to stabilize national economies.    Tapping into held sovereign funds for “rainy day” purposes was always a possibility, but not a welcomed eventuality.  Norway will withdraw a record $37.72 billion from its SWF to address Pandemic impacts to the nation’s budget, and intends asset sales as part of this withdrawal.  Indeed, sovereign wealth funds have had their test in 2020.

 

Looking forward to the balance of 2020, we shall see how the 2020 pandemic impacts new SWF formations, in Indonesia, Oman, Israel, Mozambique, and South Africa, among other nations.   Within the U.S. and Canada, our many indigenous sovereign Native / First Nations are also facing particular financial stress this year, with operating asset revenues significantly down and available reserves at risk.  In discussions about SWF’s, these sovereign Native / First Nation tribes and pueblos are often neglected.

 

SWF formation has seen significant activity over the past decade, with just under 100 new national SWF’s getting their start.

Sovereign Wealth Funds Get Their Test in 2020

Hawaii is Adding Facial Recognition at Airports as an Additional COVID-19 Detection Measure

AEC Consumer Products Monitor

 

According to an August 28 report by Travel Weekly, Hawaii expects to have its facial recognition system in place and operating at five Hawaii airports, by year-end 2020.   The facial imaging will be used in conjunction with temperature screening cameras to assist in monitoring and tracking arriving passengers at the more than 130 gates at Hawaii’s airports receiving out-of-state and international flights.    Temperature screening cameras have already been installed at Hawaii’s airports.

 

With the screening cameras, any arriving passenger who registers a temperature above 100.4 degrees is asked to submit to a voluntary secondary screening conducted by paramedics.    The five Hawaii airports that will operate with the facial recognition technology are: Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye Airport; Kahului Airport; Lihue Airport; Ellison Onizuka Kona Airport at Keahole; and Hilo Airport.

 

There are privacy concerns about the roll-out of this technology in Hawaii.   But if deployed and effective it may make a significant contribution to Hawaii’s travel industry recovery.   The facial recognition measure is in addition to other measures going into effect in Hawaii, including geo-fencing of guests at their resorts.