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The 15-Minute City concept gains tracking.

The 15-Minute City Concept Gains Traction

The-15-Minute City concept is gaining traction around the world as a placemaking tactic and means to enhance quality of life.   Although “city” is used in this coined term, this planning concept is more about a focus on livable neighborhoods and districts.

 

The “15-minute city” is a term for urban design and master planning wherein it is possible to meet the basic “needs of living” within a 15-minute walk or bike ride from a person’s home.  The needs of living include such services and amenities as:

 

  • Places of work, or, at least a coworking venue;
  • Grocers;
  • Pharmacies;
  • Schools for children, youth;
  • Health care or medical facilities, or simply, doctor and dentist offices;
  • Recreation, leisure and/or green spaces; at least a pocket or linear park;
  • Cultural venues;
  • Mass transit accessibility;
  • Affordable housing is assumed;
  • Flexible zoning to allow places with different day-part uses, such as local school facility that can be a community gathering place at night or on weekends; and
  • Places of worship are seldom mentioned as part of the 15-Minute City concept, but such places may be among the most successful community-building forces that have existed.

 

 

The planning term was first coined by by Prof. Carlos Moreno, a professor at Sorbonne University (Paris, France).  Prof. Moreno is the director of entrepreneurship and innovation at The Sorbonne.  Though popularized by the professor, the 15-Minute City concept itself  has been explored in major cities throughout the world from Melbourne to Portland, prior to its burgeoning popularity as an planning concept.

 

During 2020, the 15-Minute City concept has surged in interest as a sturdy planning concept alongside the increasing acceptance of coworking facilities and communities.   Coworking venues situated in close proximity to homes simply adds an additional destination within a 15-minute “neighborhood” that is vital within a 15-minute radii.

 

The 15-Minute City concept is a multi-faceted placemaking tactic.

Another aspect of making the 15-Minute City concept workable is the presence of affordable housing within each 15-Minute City cluster.  Many neighborhoods and districts around the world may work well for most required services and work places, but do not have the array of housing choices necessary.

 

Integrating the 15-Minute City concept with allied planning concepts is particularly interesting to local governments charged with numerous quality of life objectives and economic development initiatives.   A 15-Minute City imperative, as an example, is also deemed helpful in reducing the use of fossil fuels (vehicles), fighting carbon emissions, and thereby fighting climate change.  Also, applying the 15-Minute City thresholds of accessibility also advances the objectives for some groups in reversing local zoning codes to allow increased affordable housing options and thereby, more diversity, inclusion, and social justice.

 

The 15-Minute City concept has created such interest that purpose-built apps have been created to evaluate any particular location for 15-Minute City thresholds. Here Technologies (Eindhoven, Netherlands) is one such company that has created this kind of threshold’s map to answer the question – Do You Live in a 15-Minute City? We expect that the 15-Minute City parameters and software applications that track such notions, will join similar concepts as a niche investment asset class among those pursuing environmental, social, and governmental investments (so-called ESG Investing).

Rep. Haaland Nominated to Lead Interior Dept.

Rep. Haaland Nominated for Interior Department

Rep. Haaland is nominated to lead the Interior Department.   With Senate confirmation, Rep. Haaland will become the first Native American to serve as Cabinet secretary.

 

President-elect Joe Biden nominated Rep. Debra Haaland to helm the U.S. Department of the Interior, a federal agency forever linked with the history of Native Americans since the nation’s founding.   The Albuquerque Journal has reported that Haaland’s nomination reflects Biden’s commitment to address the historical mistreatment of Native Americans including violations of treaty obligations.

 

The Interior Department administers roughly 500 million acres of public lands and plays a key policy role on tribal issues.   In her role, Rep. Debra Haaland’s Interior Department will oversee two key tribal offices – the Bureau of Indian Affairs (“BIA”) and the Bureau of Indian Education.  The U.S. Interior Department was first established in 1849, actually established after the BIA was first established in 1824 – the oldest agency within the Department of the Interior.

 

Rep. Haaland is a Laguna Pueblo member and is well-known for her leadership roles in tribal government, administration, and economic development programs and enterprises.  Laguna Pueblo is a federally-recognized tribe of Native American Pueblo people situated to the west of metro Albuquerque, New Mexico.   The Laguna Pueblo tribal reservation includes approximately 500,000 acres of land situated in Cibola, Valencia, Bernalillo and Sandoval counties.

 

A full article regarding U.S. Rep. Haaland being nominated to lead the Interior Department, is available at the Albuquerque Journal:  Haaland gets historic Cabinet nomination

 

 

Rep. Haaland is Nominated to Lead the Interior Department

The U.S. Interior Department administers roughly 500 million acres of public lands, involving a myriad of environmental, energy, and public access issues and concerns.

Planned Community Consultants

Golf Courses Remain a Focus for Redevelopment

Golf courses remain a focus for redevelopment and repurposing as property owners explore greater highest-and-best use for their golf assets.

 

The interest in such redevelopment is straight-forward.  Golf courses were overbuilt in the U.S. and in some global regions, and the 2008 recession decimated many golf owner’s financial resources.   At the same time golf participation has steadily declined year over year, at least through 2019 (there is an exception in 2020 due to Covid-19).  With this confluence of economic difficulties and ever-changing consumer preferences for their leisure-time activities, in many instances golf course assets offered a tantalizing opportunity for adaptive re-use and repurposing.  For many cities and communities with increasing interest in local economic development and specific agendas such as affordable (if not more inclusionary) housing, these golf assets are particularly ripe for highest-and-best-use consideration.

 

The mega project proposed by Hines for Riverwalk Golf Course in San Diego, will likely spur even greater interest in golf course redevelopment.   Golf courses are often situated within attractive residential communities, with reasonable roadway access and ingress/egress for feasible re-purposing as residential projects.   Hines found such an opportunity with the Riverwalk site in a decidedly “best case” way – the Riverwalk golf course just happens to be so well-located within its region that it can support substantial mixed-use redevelopment.  Hines has proposed such a mega redevelopment project there, which could see in excess of $1 billion in new development.

 

For more information about golf course redevelopment, we have started tracking such projects as part of our ongoing client project research.   We expect golf courses to remain a focus for redevelopment, for some time to come.   StoneCreek Partners also tracks other major real estate asset classes, with some of our research and tracking published here online.   The link is available  here:

 

Golf Course Redevelopment – the Latest

 

Economic Development Consultants for Tribes

Economic Development Consultants for Tribes

Our work as economic development consultants for tribes and other indigenous nations has expanded with additional services and new regions covered.

 

StoneCreek Partners’ client work with Native American tribes and pueblos, as well as Native Hawaiians, now includes Canadian First Nation tribes and organizations.   Over the years, StoneCreek Partners has also worked with indigenous nations in addition to those in North America, including those sovereign nations in the MENA region and the Pacific Rim.

 

The Covid-19 pandemic of 2020 has increased the interest in economic development plans that can reliably produce economic results – increased jobs, new investment, and enhanced quality of life.   And sooner than later.   Our economic sector analytics have an increasingly granular focus on real estate investment asset classes.    This is due to some types of investment now being in question, and relatively new asset classes commanding investor attention.

 

Our consulting focus is on projects that can be made to happen, and less on broad programmatic objectives.

 

Another focus is on the feasibility of specific projects.   As we act as economic development consultants for tribes we explore how development might occur in a particular region, focusing more on projects that can be made to happen, and less on broad programmatic objectives.   With specific projects identified, strategic partners can be identified and pursued.

 

Today’s economic development strategies can include all manner of visitor destination strategies, location-based entertainment, sports mega-complexes, life sciences projects, and other development can prosper within specific locations and markets.  Our experience with design management, development, facilities management, and with overall dealmaking and transactions allows us to take economic strategies through implementation.

 

What is a charrette? Charrettes explainedStoneCreek Partners is a business planning and development firm, with expertise that includes commercial real estate, hospitality, location-based entertainment, and direct-to-consumer technologies. StoneCreek Partners has provided economic development planning and program implementation support to Native American tribes and their sovereign development companies, as well as to similar city, county, and state organizations.

 

Our firm’s essential value to clients is our hands-on experience in designing, developing, and operating projects and businesses. StoneCreek Partners is led by co-founder Donald Bredberg and his substantial experience as an executive with The Irvine Company, NBCUniversal, and the Riyadh-based family office of Newfield Enterprises International.

 

The firm was first established in 1984 in Los Angeles, and is now headquartered in Nevada.  Our economic development consulting for tribal nations and other indigenous nations got started shortly after the firm’s founding.

 

Additional information about our economic development consulting practice is available at this link:

 

StoneCreek Partners – Economic Development Consultants

Planned Community Consultants - project feasibility consultants

Golf Participation Up 11% Over 2019

According to the National Golf Foundation, golf participation is up 11% over 2019.   The U.S. data through October 2020, is now at 10.8% ahead of 2019’s pace despite losing 20 million rounds in the spring due to the Covid-19 lockdowns.  In fact, October marked the fifth straight month that play has been up year-over-year in every state in the continental U.S.   This increased play translates to roughly 39 million more rounds nationwide than a year ago.

 

Operating results for the U.S. golf industry represent a marked improvement over the generally dismal outlook that has existed for the past decade.   The reduction in golf participation over the decade has caused an increase in golf course’s being redeveloped or repurposed to new use.   Even with golf participation up 11% over 2019, more courses will proceed to partial or full redevelopment.  Our golf course redevelopment tracking has started and we’ll begin reporting in January 2021.

 

According to the National Golf Foundation (“NGF”), in both 2009 and 2016, roughly a quarter of public courses admitted to being in bad shape, financially.  Among private clubs, 21% were doing poorly in ’09, but seven years later that proportion had dropped to 14%.  This year, there’s been a dramatic rise in the proportion of U.S. golf facilities reporting to be in good financial shape compared to previous NGF studies, including more than half of public courses and nearly 2/3 of private clubs.  And, fewer than 1 in 10 (public and private combined) suggest that they’re currently in bad shape (0-4).

 

The National Golf Foundation article is based upon information from Golf Datatech’s monthly report.  According to its website, Golf Datatech provides the golf industry with specialized market research covering retail sales, inventory, pricing and distribution, along with consumer attitude and usage studies and strategic sales and marketing consulting.

 

The full article by National Golf Foundation about golf participation up 11% over 2019 (year over year), is available here:

 

Tracking the Impact of Covid-19 on the Golf Business – November 2020

 

 

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